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Home / About / History / The Story Behind Our Logo

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The Story Behind Our Logo

As part of our transition to Maryland University of Integrative Health (MUIH), we created a new logo, which debuted in March 2013.

In this interview, John C. Wilson, director of publications, talks about how he created our new visual identity.

Maryland University of Integrative Health logoHow did you approach the creation of the logo?

From the start, I knew that I wanted to portray our exciting vision for the future while paying tribute to our rich past. To that end, I explored many different typefaces and did research into other contemporary logo designs. I also knew I wanted to keep purple as the school color for continuity and tradition. However, I have chosen to slightly adjust the color to make it just a bit lighter and brighter to convey the excitement and energy of a new day for the school.

The circle is a key element of the new logo. What message do you want it to convey?

The circle represents a number of things. It stands for wholeness and oneness, and it represents our planet and the cycles of nature. Also the concept of “walking the circle” is a central practice of SOPHIA, one of our institution’s signature programs. The circle also speaks to movement and process, which reminds us that wellness is a journey, not a destination.

You’ll also notice that in the logo, some of the words are inside the circle and some are outside the circle, which to my mind speaks to the integration of different healing modalities—of Eastern and Western traditions, and of traditional medicine and modern science. We bridge many worlds here and I wanted to reflect that in our visual identity, as well.

Can you tell us about the significance of the typeface?

I chose a sans serif typeface, which is characterized by clean lines and a modern appearance. Tahoma is the particular typeface I selected out of the many hundreds of styles because I feel it conveys the energy and vitality of this big change. Many san serif typefaces seem very plain and I wanted one that had some personality and distinction. In contrast, the word “of” is in an italic serif typeface called Minion, to not only add a distinctive flourish, but to also reflect movement. Minion will also be used as a complementary typeface in our publications.

Click here to download a style guide for the appropriate use of the new visual identity for the university.